What is Tacticool? Duracoat and more

Tacticool

Derived from the word “Tactical”.

1.) Descriptive word for equipment or clothing that does not have any tactical purpose; but looks cool.
2.) A person who is a city dweller; but wishes to look like a warrior or as if they are/were in the armed forces.
3.) Appearance that mimics military or martial arts.”

4.) Descriptive word for equipment or clothing that does have a tactical purpose; but has more than needed or required installed on the firearm.

I added in number 4. Most of us have seen that guy, they have every known attachment both tactical and non-tactical, weighing in at over 50 pounds. They hump it around for a bit and then realize how heavy and impractical it is and start removing stuff they don’t need for that mission.

Now that we have the bolt on accessories figured out, let’s talk about coating them and / or your weapon.  There are two processes we will discuss application about; hydrographics and DuraCoat. These are very basic steps.

First to apply hydrographics a.k.a Water transfer printing:

  1. The part must be free of all dirt, oils, wax, grease, loose paint or other contaminants that could affect the finished product.
  2. Mask off areas not to be printed on etc. Use the universal primer to prime the part.
  3. Spray the part with the appropriate base coat.
  4. Item is submerged into dipping container with the film floating on top of the water.
  5. Rinse the part to remove any residue from the dipping procedure.
  6. Finish the item with the spray clear coat.

And now for Duracoat:

  1. Cover the surface where you will be working with newspaper.
  2. Dis-assemble the entire firearm and clean all pieces thoroughly, making sure there is no trace of oil on any piece you want to coat.
  3. Use denatured alcohol or TruStrip for a final wipe down of the parts you want to Duracoat to remove all oils.
  4. Use painter’s tape to mask off any parts that will not be painted.
  5. Make jigs or snip pieces of the wire to make hooks to hang the parts to spray and dry.
  6. Have some lacquer thinner ready for any potential mistakes and to clean up.
  7. Set up the air sprayer and set the compressor to 30 psi.
  8. Mix the Duracoat paints to get the color you desire. Test spray on a scrap piece of metal to check color.
  9. Combine 1 part Duracoat Hardener to 14 parts Duracoat paint. Shake thoroughly for at least 3 minutes, and pour into the paint receptacle on the air-sprayer.
  10. Hold spray tip 4 to 8 inches from the parts and spray Duracoat with sweeping passes from left to right. You can make multiple passes to get to the ideal final thickness of 1 mil, applied in 1 to 3 passes.
  11. Set parts aside to dry and cure. They will be dry enough for light use in 24 hours, but ideally they should be allowed to dry for 2-4 weeks.

As with everything AR related, there are a crazy amount of accessories and at least twice as many opinions. Everything from Backup metal sights to chainsaw attachments. It always breaks down to what you need, what you want, and how much money you have. It is hard to know what you need if you don’t know it exists. Learn, go on line, join a shooting club, take a class, show the next generation.

 

REF: https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=tacticool

http://www.dip123.com/

https://www.wikihow.com/Apply-Duracoat